health

Hot Weather Safety for Older Adults

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Too much heat is not safe for anyone. It is even riskier if you are older or have health problems. It is important to get relief from the heat quickly. If not, you might begin to feel confused or faint. Your heart could become stressed and stop beating.

Being hot for too long can be a problem. It can cause several illnesses, all grouped under the name hyperthermia (hy-per-THER-mee-uh):

Tips: Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather!

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Now is the time to prepare for the high temperatures that kill hundreds of people every year. Extreme heat causes more than 600 deaths each year. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet many people still die from extreme heat every year.

Take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated, and keep informed. Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can't compensate for it and properly cool you off. The main things affecting your body's ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather are:

Your Health: Tips for Traveling with Diabetes

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Don't let good diabetes management go on vacation just because you did. Traveling to new places gets you out of your routine--that's a big part of the fun. But delayed meals, unfamiliar food, being more active than usual, and different time zones can all disrupt diabetes management. Plan ahead so you can count on more fun and less worry on the way and when you get to your destination.

Before You Go

1.Visit your doctor for a checkup to ensure you're fit for the trip. Make sure to ask your doctor:

Health Benefits of Human-Animal Interactions

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Nothing compares to the joy of coming home to a loyal companion. The unconditional love of a pet can do more than keep you company. Pets may also decrease stress, improve heart health, and even help children with their emotional and social skills.

An estimated 68% of U.S. households have a pet. But who benefits from an animal? And which type of pet brings health benefits?

Over the past 10 years, the National Institutes of Health has partnered with the Mars Corporation's WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition to answer questions like these by funding research studies.